Spain´s Coaste

Costa Brava

 

The Costa Brava is a coastal region of Catalonia in northeastern Spain, consisting of the comarques of Alt Empordà, Baix Empordà and Selva in the province of Girona. Costa Brava stretches from the town of Blanes, 60 km northeast of Barcelona, to the French border.

Costa Dorada

 

The Costa Daurada is a strip of Mediterranean coastline in Spain's Catalonia region, southwest of Barcelona. Resorts and beaches line the coast, known for its calm, shallow waters. Tarragona, the area’s main city, has the Roman Tarragona Amphitheatre and a 12th-century cathedral. Nearby is the Roman Pont del Diable aqueduct. The city of Reus hosts the Gaudí Centre, with exhibits on the famed architect’s work.
 

Costa del Azahar 

 

Costa del Azahar or Costa dels Tarongers is the name for the coast of the province of Castellón in Spain, from Vinaròs to Almenara. Towns on the Costa del Azahar include Peñíscola, Oropesa del Mar, Benicàssim and Castellón de la Plana.

Costa de Valencia

 

The port city of Valencia lies on Spain’s southeastern coast, where the Turia River meets the Mediterranean Sea. It’s known for its City of Arts and Sciences, with futuristic structures including a planetarium, an oceanarium and an interactive museum. Valencia also has several beaches, including some within nearby Albufera Park, a wetlands reserve with a lake and walking trails.

Costa Blanca

 

The Costa Blanca is over 200 kilometres of Mediterranean coastline in the Alicante province, on the southeastern coast of Spain. It extends from the town of Dénia in the north, beyond which lies the Costa del Azahar, to Pilar de la Horadada in the south, beyond which lies the Costa Cálida.

Costa Calida

 

The Costa Cálida is the approximately 250 km stretch of Mediterranean coastline of the Spanish province of Murcia. This region has a micro-climate which features comparatively hot mean annual temperatures and a relative degree of aridity. 

Costa Almería

The Costa de Almería consists of the coastal municipalities of the province of Almería, in the autonomous community of Andalusia, Spain. The coast extends 217 kilometres and includes 13 municipalities, from Pulpí on the border with the province of Murcia to Adra on the border with the province of Granada.

Costa Tropical


Costa Tropical is a comarca in southern Spain, corresponding to the Mediterranean coastline of the province of Granada, Andalusia. It is also but less frequently called the Costa de Granada or Costa Granadina. 

Costa del Sol

The Costa del Sol is a region in the south of Spain, in the autonomous community of Andalusia, comprising the coastal towns and communities along the coastline of the Province of Málaga. The Costa del Sol is situated between two lesser known coastal regions, the Costa de la Luz and the Costa Tropical.

Costa de la Luz

 

The Costa de la Luz is a section of the Andalusian coast in Spain facing the Atlantic; it extends from Tarifa in the south, along the coasts of the Province of Cádiz and the Province of Huelva, to the mouth of the Guadiana River.

Mallorca

Mallorca (Majorca) is one of Spain's Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean. It's known for beach resorts, sheltered coves, limestone mountains and Roman and Moorish remains. Capital Palma has nightlife, the Moorish Almudaina royal palace and 13th-century Santa María Cathedral. Stone-built villages include Pollença, with its art galleries and music festival, and hillside Fornalutx, surrounded by citrus plantations.

Tenneriffa

Tenerife is the largest of Spain’s Canary Islands, off West Africa. It's dominated by Mt. Teide, a dormant volcano that is Spain's tallest peak. Tenerife may be best known for its Carnaval de Santa Cruz, a huge pre-Lent festival with parades, music, dancing and colorful costumes. The island has many beaches (with sands from yellow to black) and resort areas, including Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas.

Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria is one of Spain’s Canary Islands, off northwestern Africa. It's known for its black lava and white sand beaches. Its southern beaches include bustling Playa del Inglés and Puerto Rico as well as quieter Puerto de Mogán and San Agustín. In the north, capital city Las Palmas is a major stop for cruise ships and duty-free shopping. The island’s interior is rural and mountainous.

Ibiza, Formentera

Tenerife is the largest of Spain’s Canary Islands, off West Africa. It's dominated by Mt. Teide, a dormant volcano that is Spain's tallest peak. Tenerife may be best known for its Carnaval de Santa Cruz, a huge pre-Lent festival with parades, music, dancing and colorful costumes. The island has many beaches (with sands from yellow to black) and resort areas, including Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas.

Formentera is the smallest of Spain’s Balearic islands in the Mediterranean Sea. It’s reachable by ferry from its more crowded, better known island neighbor, Ibiza, and makes for a popular day-trip destination in the summertime. It’s known for its clear waters and long stretches of beach backed by dunes and pine trees. Pastimes include snorkeling and sailing, with equipment rentals and boat charters available.